Archive of ‘clear wax’ category

Before and After in the Studio…

headboard1

 

Now that the kitchen makeover is done, and the master bathroom is complete (reveal coming soon!) I’ve been back in my studio doing some custom work!  I just completed a lovely headboard using Old Ochre and Napoleonic Blue!  I am LOVING Napoleonic Blue and was so excited my client wanted it on her headboard!

The before was not bad at all…it just did not match her decor and she was ready for a change.

beforeheadboard

I sketched out a idea and got to work…

headboardsketch

I was thrilled when the only guidance she gave me was color and let me do what I felt the headboard needed!

headboard2

I painted it all in Old Ochre, highlighted it with Napoleonic Blue, finished it all with Clear Wax and then added some Dark Wax.

headboard3

Answers to Readers Questions about Chalk Paint®

I’ve been getting lots of questions lately and I thought I’d take a few a break from my house stuff to address a few of them….I did personally answer them, but I thought I’d share a few with everyone.
Question:  I am confused about the order in which you paint, wax and distress.  Does it matter which order you do this in?
Answer:  If you have read any of Annie Sloan’s wonderful books, or watched her You Tube video’s, you will notice that Annie paints, waxes (clear and dark) before she uses sandpaper to distress.  After she distresses she will then add back some wax to the area she removed it in during distressing.  This method is known as the Annie Sloan Method.
However, it seems that most American’s paint, distress and then wax.  Both ways are perfectly fine in my opinion.  I prefer to paint, distress and then apply my wax.  I think it is a personal preference as to which method you choose to do.  I don’t see much of a difference between the two.  In my class I have my students do it both ways so they can understand the way Annie prefers, try the other way and pick which method suits them.
Distressing before you wax creates a lot more “chalk” dust.  However, distressing after you wax takes a lot more muscle and you use a lot more sandpaper!
Question:  My husband and I painted our kitchen cabinets with Pure White, but it just seems too “textured”.  Do you have suggestions to make the Chalk Paint less “textured”?
 
Answer:  I do have experience with this for sure.  I used Pure White Chalk Paint® on my kitchen cabinets in my old house.  I wanted a clean white look with no distressing.  I wanted White White! When I painted my cabinets Pure White had just hit the states and it was my first time using it.  Since then I have learned a few things about Pure White.
1.  It had no pigments in it.  It is PURE White.  I love it!  I’m a white white girl.  However, with no pigments the consistency of this color is a tad different.  Using it will require an additional coat for the best coverage.  A tip I’ve learned is to use a base coat of white primer (I use Zinsser).  This will cut down how much Pure White you will have to use.
2.  Unless you are willing to use a very fine grit sandpaper and sand ALL your kitchen cabinets smooth after painting, you will not get a smooth look with Chalk Paint®.  No matter what you are going to have brush strokes with this paint.  If you are going for a smooth, clean, all white look on your kitchen cabinets it is my opinion that Pure White Chalk Paint® is not the right paint for the job.  I would use Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams Pro Classic.
3.  Another tip is that you can mix some Old White into the Pure White to give it a little thicker consistency.  I love a 50/50 mix of Old White and Pure White!!
I hope these tips help!!  If you have questions feel free to ask!

31 Days of ASCP, Day 17….Pumpkins!

We are huge Auburn University Football fans!
So, when I popped the lid on Napoleonic Blue I knew it had to paired up with some orange in honor of the blue and orange Auburn Tigers!

I painted one coat of Napoleonic Blue on my pumpkin.  In no time it was dry…love that!  I then took some 150 grit sandpaper and rubbed it up and down the pumpkin, revealing pops of orange!  I wiped the dust off and then coated it with clear wax.  In less than 30 minutes the pumpkin was done!

My Taylor sign was also a super quick project.  
Trish had picked up a stack of these chippy boards recently when she was on a “pickin” trip.  I grabbed one up and stenciled on my name and house number with black craft paint.  When that dried I waxed the entire board with AS clear wax.  The board looks as good as it did the first day I put it out and it has been poured rain on for days on end!  Thanks to AS wax!  

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31 Day of ASCP, Day 11…Waxing

A very important element in using Annie Sloan Paint is the application of the wax.  This is when the “magic” really happens!  Annie makes two waxes, one is Clear and the other is Dark.  The Clear Wax pretty much looks like a tub of Crisco and the Dark is well….very dark, a very rich brown.  
When you are finished painting your piece you will want to first apply a coat of clear wax.  This is very important.  If you apply your brown wax first it will stain the color of your paint.  The clear layer acts as a barrier and gives you a “platform” to work on the brown wax.  

A wax brush is a very helpful tool when applying large amounts of wax all over a piece.  You may also apply the wax with other natural bristle brushes and soft lint free rags.  But, once you have used this brush, you will be hooked and won’t be able to imagine life without one.  It is made of horse hair and retails for $34.95…worth it!  If you will be waxing often we also recommend two.  You will want to keep one brush for clear and one brush for dark.  We purchased ours at Total Bliss in Summerfield, NC.  Check with your local Annie Sloan Paint stockist to see if they carry it….many do.  
In this photo I have applied a layer of clear wax, liberally applying with my wax brush.  I then wiped off the excess with a lint free rag and then distressed.  I then began to apply the dark wax.  I applied a fair amount, pushing it into the detail, and into the nooks and crannies.  

Once the piece was covered in brown wax I began wiping off the excess.  If my wax was difficult to move or wipe, I used additional clear wax to smooth and even it out.  When your wax is fully dry…usually in a few hours, {or you can wait up to 24 hours} buff it to a beautiful shine with some cheesecloth, or a soft lint free rag.  
Working with wax is really quite easy once you get the hang of it.  It is one of the techniques we teach in all of our Annie Sloan Workshops at Total Bliss.  So much can be achieved with these two waxes!  Again, this stuff is limitless!  

Can you see how the brown wax has merged into all the nooks and crannies and into the brush marks? I love it!  The sloppier you paint the more brush strokes you make for wax to stick in!  
This piece was painted with Paris Grey and Old White.  A fabulous combination! 
To find out where you can purchase Annie Sloan Chalk Paint and Waxes
 visit Annie Sloan Unfolded!
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