Archive of ‘old white’ category

Hueology Kitchens…Before and After

cottkitchencollageHere is a look at our latest kitchen makeover!

Our client had previously had her builder grade oak cabinets painted and glazed very dark quite a few years ago.  The island was also painted black.

Before:

cottkitchenbefore2cottkitchenbefore1cottkitchenbefore3We used Old White Chalk Paint® on the perimeter cabinets and added some dark brown glaze.  The island was done with Chateau Grey Chalk Paint® with Old White highlights and dark brown glaze.  The silver brush nickel knobs were replaced with oil rubbed bronze handles and pulls! It is amazing how lighter and brighter the kitchen became!

After

cottkitchenafter1cottkitchenafter8cottkitchenafter7 cottkitchenafter4

A Twist on Provence….

I was beyond giddy when a friend of mine asked me to paint this antique oak dresser she had recently acquired!  Of course I forgot to take a before photo!
The oak was natural and beautiful and thirsty for some paint….
Does that make sense?
What I mean is that it is a treat to paint real natural wood.
I was even more thrilled when we decided to go with a 50/50 mix of Provence and Old White Chalk Paint® decorative paint by Annie Sloan.  Provence is one of my favorite colors and I think I loved it even more with the Old White in it!!
The natural grain of the oak was beautiful so we decided to keep some of it showing through by doing a wash of Old White on top, and sealed it with some Clear Soft Wax.
The original handles were a great aged bronze.  So instead of Dark Wax we used Royal Designs stencil creme in Bronze Aged and rubbed in areas to add an aged look.  I then sealed it all with Clear Soft Wax.  I was super pleased at how the stencil creme finished this piece off.  The “predictable” outcome of distressing and using Dark Wax just would have been too “predictable”! Ha!
My friend is using this as a nightstand on her side of the bed!

31 Days of ASCP, Day 25….Have We Inspired You?

25 Days of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint!
Has anyone been around since Day 1?  
We hope you have enjoyed it thus far!  Get your paint brushes out and your camera’s ready because you have 6 days left to show us what you’ve got!
We are going to conclude the series on Day 31 with a Annie Sloan Chalk Paint Linky Party!!
We want to see what you have been up too.  So, if you have a blog please link up a post on October 31st showing a piece that you have done with ASCP.
Don’t have a blog?  That is OK, we still want to give you credit if you have been inspired from our blog.  So, e-mail us at hueology@gmail.com a picture or two of your project with a brief description of what you did, colors, etc. and we will post them on our blog.  Please e-mail them by October 28th if you want to be included in the Linky Party.  

Here is a look at a great 6 leg table we did in Old White and touches of Paris Gray.  

To find out where you can purchase Annie Sloan Chalk Paint and Waxes
 visit Annie Sloan Unfolded!

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31 Days of ASCP, Day 22…..Scenes from a Porch

This fabulous table was the second piece I painted with ASCP.  You can read about the entire before and after project on my “other” blog One Nutty Girl.  Where was Trish for this project?  Tooling around in Europe for 2 weeks!  After I finished this Duck Egg beauty  I decided I HAD to keep it.  We had just started a screen porch project and I decided to put it on the porch once it was completed.  
The chairs are Old White and super distressed!
This bench was originally white.  I loved it, but wanted to add a little bit more color.  I slapped on one super quick messy coat of Versailles, let it dry and then got out my Ryobi Corner Cat and distressed it.  One coat of clear wax and I had the perfect super quick makeover!  

Check out my fabulous ceiling!  No, it is not Annie Sloan, but I had to show it off!  I’m just smitten with the blue bead board!
Thanks for visiting….we love our followers!!!

To find out where you can purchase Annie Sloan Chalk Paint and Waxes
 visit Annie Sloan Unfolded!
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31 Days of ASCP, Day 19….Mixing Color!

Hav you tried mixing color yet?
We have done a little bit of mixing and playing to make new colors.  
The easiest way to start is to make different shades of your favorite colors is by adding Old White to them.

We like to play using teaspoonfuls, that way you are not using too much of your paint experimenting.  
Another important thing to remember is to RECORD your mixes in case you want to make them again!  Paint a swatch on a sheet of paper and right down your formula under it.  Another way we’ve seen it done is to use paint stirrers with the color on it and write down the formula on the paint stir stick.  
Mixing is not just for Old White….mixing 2 and 3 colors together is really fun!
This glorious apple green was made with 3 colors – Antibes Green, Arles and Chateau Grey!
One color we have failed at over and over is Orange!  So, we are super excited that Barcelona Orange will be back anytime now!  We can’t wait to pop the lid on that paint something Orange!  
Have you mixed anything together yet?

Do tell…we know there are some fabulous recipes out there!
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31 Days of ASCP, Day 18….Stars and Stripes

What can you do with a little bit of Red {Emperor’s Silk} White {Old White} and Blue {Greek Blue}?

You can stripe some barn wood and add some stars!
What can you do with a boring dresser?
You can stripe it!

We took some Duck Egg Blue and added Old White to get a lighter hue of the Duck Egg!
Have you thought outside the box with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint yet?

Break out and try something new and different!


To find out where you can purchase Annie Sloan Chalk Paint and Waxes
 visit Annie Sloan Unfolded!
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31 Day of ASCP, Day 11…Waxing

A very important element in using Annie Sloan Paint is the application of the wax.  This is when the “magic” really happens!  Annie makes two waxes, one is Clear and the other is Dark.  The Clear Wax pretty much looks like a tub of Crisco and the Dark is well….very dark, a very rich brown.  
When you are finished painting your piece you will want to first apply a coat of clear wax.  This is very important.  If you apply your brown wax first it will stain the color of your paint.  The clear layer acts as a barrier and gives you a “platform” to work on the brown wax.  

A wax brush is a very helpful tool when applying large amounts of wax all over a piece.  You may also apply the wax with other natural bristle brushes and soft lint free rags.  But, once you have used this brush, you will be hooked and won’t be able to imagine life without one.  It is made of horse hair and retails for $34.95…worth it!  If you will be waxing often we also recommend two.  You will want to keep one brush for clear and one brush for dark.  We purchased ours at Total Bliss in Summerfield, NC.  Check with your local Annie Sloan Paint stockist to see if they carry it….many do.  
In this photo I have applied a layer of clear wax, liberally applying with my wax brush.  I then wiped off the excess with a lint free rag and then distressed.  I then began to apply the dark wax.  I applied a fair amount, pushing it into the detail, and into the nooks and crannies.  

Once the piece was covered in brown wax I began wiping off the excess.  If my wax was difficult to move or wipe, I used additional clear wax to smooth and even it out.  When your wax is fully dry…usually in a few hours, {or you can wait up to 24 hours} buff it to a beautiful shine with some cheesecloth, or a soft lint free rag.  
Working with wax is really quite easy once you get the hang of it.  It is one of the techniques we teach in all of our Annie Sloan Workshops at Total Bliss.  So much can be achieved with these two waxes!  Again, this stuff is limitless!  

Can you see how the brown wax has merged into all the nooks and crannies and into the brush marks? I love it!  The sloppier you paint the more brush strokes you make for wax to stick in!  
This piece was painted with Paris Grey and Old White.  A fabulous combination! 
To find out where you can purchase Annie Sloan Chalk Paint and Waxes
 visit Annie Sloan Unfolded!
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